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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: The thread of complete randomness  (Read 12275 times)
slowdancer
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« Reply #3885 on: Sep 2nd, 2015, 11:51am »

Time is relative. In 1985, I watched Back To The Future and observed Marty McFly going back to 1955. I thought, how long ago is that. Now, I am watching the movie again on amazon prime and if I go back 30 years from today, I end up in - well - 1985. That doesn`t seem to be so long ago....
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« Reply #3886 on: Sep 2nd, 2015, 7:01pm »

I often get nostalgia about the old millennium. embarassed
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« Reply #3887 on: Sep 3rd, 2015, 07:35am »

on Sep 2nd, 2015, 11:51am, slowdancer wrote:
Time is relative. In 1985, I watched Back To The Future and observed Marty McFly going back to 1955. I thought, how long ago is that. Now, I am watching the movie again on amazon prime and if I go back 30 years from today, I end up in - well - 1985. That doesn`t seem to be so long ago....


Quite! As I think I said sometime last year, as of this year, 2015, the entire series will be set in the past! sad

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NoSonOfVine
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« Reply #3888 on: Sep 4th, 2015, 03:56am »

on Sep 2nd, 2015, 7:01pm, Schrottrocker wrote:
I often get nostalgia about the old millennium. embarassed

I have a love-hate relationship with nostalgia. On the one hand, it's great to reminisce about one's past. On the other, it can make you forget to appreciate the future, and once in a while I'm a bit guilty of this. Online right now, nostalgia is utterly massive. Loads of people are revisiting their childhoods, and it's getting rather out of hand. When a reboot of a TV show or movie a lot of people liked is announced, the original fans often get very upset. Personally, I don't care about remakes or reboots. It doesn't spoil the original at all, it's just another version of something for a new audience. This is what nostalgia is now mostly linked with - not reminiscing, but getting upset over things perceived as a detriment to one's fond memories.

Though nostalgia can play tricks on you and make you think you liked something more than you really did, occasionally it can make you see things in a different light, and make you like it even more than you used to. When I was a kid, there was a show I watched a lot called Dexter's Laboratory, and I loved it. Last week, I was re-watching some of the episodes. One I re-watched is an episode called Dad Is Disturbed... and it's surprisingly adult for a children's cartoon. The episode focuses on the Dad character, who wants to watch an important golf game, but the rest of the family won't leave him alone. When I was a kid, it was funny because of how angry he got, but as an adult, it's even funnier because the episode is a satire on how some adults can be overly attached to superficial things and put them before family time - and the end of the episode connotes the hypocrisy in this. Another episode, Topped Off, satirises the need for adults to drink coffee in the morning just to start the day. When the parent characters find out that there's no coffee left, they both break down in tears as if it's a serious tragedy. And as a person who drinks a cup of coffee almost every morning (and if not in the morning, some time in the day), it's just so funny. grin
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Dust
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« Reply #3889 on: Sep 4th, 2015, 05:20am »

on Sep 4th, 2015, 03:56am, NoSonOfVine wrote:
I have a love-hate relationship with nostalgia....


rolleyes rolleyes rolleyes wink

Sincere apologies, NoSon. I can't help but smile at your ruminations on nostalgia. I still have socks older than you.

Dexter's Laboratory, lol.

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NoSonOfVine
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« Reply #3890 on: Sep 4th, 2015, 05:33am »

on Sep 4th, 2015, 05:20am, Dust wrote:
Sincere apologies, NoSon. I can't help but smile at your ruminations on nostalgia. I still have socks older than you.

Yeah, that's another debated thing. Not everyone agrees on how old you have to be nostalgic. It depends on one's connection with the thing they are nostalgic for. I get annoyed by people who say they're nostalgic for something that's still relevant, though. That's when it gets ludicrous in my book.
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« Reply #3891 on: Sep 4th, 2015, 05:50am »

on Sep 4th, 2015, 05:33am, NoSonOfVine wrote:
Yeah, that's another debated thing. Not everyone agrees on how old you have to be nostalgic. It depends on one's connection with the thing they are nostalgic for. I get annoyed by people who say they're nostalgic for something that's still relevant, though. That's when it gets ludicrous in my book.

I don't think it's a matter of age, but a function of the company you're in. Most of the Forumers here are nearly twice your age or more, so it's a little unusual to read nostalgic comments about something that has occurred since our last colonoscopy. grin

But please keep at it. As you may know, my son is your age, and it's interesting to read your thoughts on culture and society... I enjoy the British perspective. My boy watched Dexter's Laboratory as well.

(I forget... are you okay with being called "British"? I recall that some here are not.) grin
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« Reply #3892 on: Sep 4th, 2015, 05:52am »

on Sep 4th, 2015, 05:50am, Dust wrote:
(I forget... are you okay with being called "British"? I recall that some here are not.) grin

I'm not just okay with it, I prefer it. smiley Thanks for asking. smiley
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Schrottrocker
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« Reply #3893 on: Sep 4th, 2015, 08:07am »

In NSOV's defense (-ce? tongue ), I can get nostalgic about things that are just 5 years ago too. Particularly things about the internet. For example, in 2010 the great exodus from all social networks other than Facebook happened. I used to spend my time before on studiVZ, a platform which was originally made for university students. Between 2006 to 2010 this used to be the network for all German uni students. I found old friends there I hadn't talked to for ages, I found new friends, I found new music through other people, I even met a few people in real life I had found on this site. It was a lot of fun and a great place for connecting and having interesting discussions about everything, from music to politics to funny stuff, just everything. As soon as in 2009 I already found myself nostalgic about the beginnings of studiVZ because I saw it changing a lot: more and more random people registered there who had never been at a uni, the whole place started to become faceless, finally in 2010 everybody left for Facebook. I still have my old account on studiVZ but the place is deserted. Facebook is not the same.

Then again..... give me a book by some of the great writers from the past and I get nostalgic about the 18th century. Currently I'm reading an old book with poems by Friedrich Schiller, the second huge genius of German literature after Goethe who was something like the Shakespeare of Germany. Though I'm reading these poems for the first time now, I have known of a good deal of them by what my mother and grandmother told me from their school days. They still had to learn this literature, it was standard for like 150 years; now it is getting forgotten. The language is different from today's usage, I know most of my generation and today's kids will have problems to even understand the words. It's not so hard though once you get into it. The poems themselves are wonderful, these guys back then had a craft to use language which is incredible. It's notable what numerous references to Greek mythology the poems contain, indicating clearly that in these times there was no need to explain all the names of Greek gods and Greek places and Greek heroes, they were universally known in educated circles. All this is so largely lost today.
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xx Re: The thread of complete randomness
« Reply #3894 on: Sep 4th, 2015, 4:34pm »

on Sep 4th, 2015, 05:20am, Dust wrote:
rolleyes rolleyes rolleyes wink

Sincere apologies, NoSon. I can't help but smile at your ruminations on nostalgia. I still have socks older than you.

Dexter's Laboratory, lol.

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"I've got corns older than you, son"
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NoSonOfVine
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« Reply #3895 on: Sep 4th, 2015, 4:35pm »

on Sep 4th, 2015, 08:07am, Schrottrocker wrote:
In NSOV's defense (-ce? tongue ), I can get nostalgic about things that are just 5 years ago too. Particularly things about the internet. For example, in 2010 the great exodus from all social networks other than Facebook happened. I used to spend my time before on studiVZ, a platform which was originally made for university students. Between 2006 to 2010 this used to be the network for all German uni students. I found old friends there I hadn't talked to for ages, I found new friends, I found new music through other people, I even met a few people in real life I had found on this site. It was a lot of fun and a great place for connecting and having interesting discussions about everything, from music to politics to funny stuff, just everything. As soon as in 2009 I already found myself nostalgic about the beginnings of studiVZ because I saw it changing a lot: more and more random people registered there who had never been at a uni, the whole place started to become faceless, finally in 2010 everybody left for Facebook. I still have my old account on studiVZ but the place is deserted. Facebook is not the same.

Then again..... give me a book by some of the great writers from the past and I get nostalgic about the 18th century. Currently I'm reading an old book with poems by Friedrich Schiller, the second huge genius of German literature after Goethe who was something like the Shakespeare of Germany. Though I'm reading these poems for the first time now, I have known of a good deal of them by what my mother and grandmother told me from their school days. They still had to learn this literature, it was standard for like 150 years; now it is getting forgotten. The language is different from today's usage, I know most of my generation and today's kids will have problems to even understand the words. It's not so hard though once you get into it. The poems themselves are wonderful, these guys back then had a craft to use language which is incredible. It's notable what numerous references to Greek mythology the poems contain, indicating clearly that in these times there was no need to explain all the names of Greek gods and Greek places and Greek heroes, they were universally known in educated circles. All this is so largely lost today.

Great post. Thanks, Schrott. smiley
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« Reply #3896 on: Sep 5th, 2015, 2:45pm »

on Sep 4th, 2015, 08:07am, Schrottrocker wrote:
Then again..... give me a book by some of the great writers from the past and I get nostalgic about the 18th century. Currently I'm reading an old book with poems by Friedrich Schiller, the second huge genius of German literature after Goethe who was something like the Shakespeare of Germany. Though I'm reading these poems for the first time now, I have known of a good deal of them by what my mother and grandmother told me from their school days. They still had to learn this literature, it was standard for like 150 years; now it is getting forgotten. The language is different from today's usage, I know most of my generation and today's kids will have problems to even understand the words. It's not so hard though once you get into it. The poems themselves are wonderful, these guys back then had a craft to use language which is incredible. It's notable what numerous references to Greek mythology the poems contain, indicating clearly that in these times there was no need to explain all the names of Greek gods and Greek places and Greek heroes, they were universally known in educated circles. All this is so largely lost today.

It was similar in Britain: well-educated people (or rather boys) were given a “classical education” including the history, myths & languages of ancient Greece & Rome. This was probably still being taught to our band at Charterhouse in the 1960s, but very few people here have it now. My mum read me the Greek myths, but most people aren’t familiar with them, & that’s probably the same now everywhere except Greece.

British schools teach Shakespeare & some 19th-century British authors but mostly it seems to be American books like “Of Mice & Men” which apparently are meant to be easier to understand rolleyes
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xx Re: The thread of complete randomness
« Reply #3897 on: Sep 5th, 2015, 5:32pm »

on Sep 5th, 2015, 2:45pm, boredatwork wrote:
“Of Mice & Men” which apparently are meant to be easier to understand rolleyes

It's a great book, though. Short and sweet.
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xx Re: The thread of complete randomness
« Reply #3898 on: Sep 6th, 2015, 04:49am »

on Sep 5th, 2015, 5:32pm, NoSonOfVine wrote:
It's a great book, though. Short and sweet.


I hated it! (circa 1974 when I was at school!)
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Ian

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xx Re: The thread of complete randomness
« Reply #3899 on: Sep 6th, 2015, 04:53am »

on Sep 5th, 2015, 2:45pm, boredatwork wrote:
It was similar in Britain: well-educated people (or rather boys) were given a “classical education” including the history, myths & languages of ancient Greece & Rome. This was probably still being taught to our band at Charterhouse in the 1960s, but very few people here have it now. My mum read me the Greek myths, but most people aren’t familiar with them, & that’s probably the same now everywhere except Greece.

British schools teach Shakespeare & some 19th-century British authors but mostly it seems to be American books like “Of Mice & Men” which apparently are meant to be easier to understand rolleyes


Bizarrely, my daughter is really into Greek mythology (and the Bard), some of that may have come from school, but she seems to have embraced it willingly and taken an active interest. I guess it's rare though.
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Ian

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